Sunday, August 24, 2014

Back to School: The 70s vs. Today, A Lot has Changed

Back to School in the 70s

1. Take the kids downtown to go shopping at Sears for back to school clothes the last week of August. Get everyone a new pair of corduroys and a striped tee shirt. Buy the boys a pair of dungarees and the girls a pair of culottes. No, Jennifer, you can't have that orange and red poncho. Promise you will crochet her a better one with much more fringe. Get the girls a package of that rainbow, fuzzy yarn they like in their hair. You are done. You have spent a total of $43.00. Now take everyone to the Woolworth's lunch counter for grilled cheeses and chocolate milk.




2. On the night before the first day of school (that would be the Sunday night after Labor Day, of course, you know, mid-September) throw the kids in the way back of the station wagon and drag them downtown to Eckerds, K-Mart, Ames, Dollar General, Drug Fair or the like and hurry them over to the back-to-school area to pick out a lunchbox. Make sure to tell them get a move on because you don't have all night for them to make a damn decision. They need to get in bed by eight and yes, they're going to miss the Wonderful World of Disney if they can't decide between The Fonz and Dukes of Hazzard. Good Lord, why is it so hard for them to pick? Tell Kimberly if she can't make up her mind between Holly Hobbie and The Bionic Woman then you're going to pick Pigs in Space and you don't want to hear another word about it until June. Grab a composition book for each of them and a pack of pencils too. That's all they need. Remember to save some grocery bags so they can cover their textbooks with them after the first day of school.


3. Buy yourself a pack of Virginia Slims on the way out and smoke three of them on the way home.

4. Get up in the morning and make yourself a cup of Sanka with Sweet 'n' Low. Line up all the lunchboxes on the formica counter top in your kitchen. Open up a bag of Wonder Bread and do this assembly line style.

5. Spread yellow mustard on bread. Slap baloney on bread. Unwrap American cheese slices and put on top of baloney. Put top on the sandwich and wrap sandwich in tin foil or wax paper. Put it in the lunchbox. Every kid gets the same exact lunch. Period.

6. Alternate sandwich choices could include: peanut butter and grape jelly, peanut butter and marshmallow fluff, the end of last night's leftover roast beef or the ever popular with children tuna fish with large chunks of onions and celery and Miracle Whip.

7. Put some Planter's Cheese Balls into a baggie and close with a twist tie.

8. Take Twinkies out of the box. Put one in each child's lunch box.

9. Fill Thermoses with either Kool-Aid or whole milk.

10. Include a red delicious apple even though you know that damned apple is just going to come home uneaten again, which is fine because you can keep adding the same one until it practically rots.



11. Close the lunchboxes. You're done. Go put some Barry Manilow on the record player and celebrate that your kids are out of the house until dinner time. They'll grab them, along with a frosted, dutch apple Pop-Tart on the way out the door as they walk a half mile down the road to get to the bus stop.

Back to School 2014

1. Take five deep breaths and say a positive affirmation. School begins in two weeks. It is the middle of July. Don't worry, you still have time to order BPA-free bento boxes and authentic Indian tiffins made with special stainless steel that did not involve any child-labor, sweat shops or animal cruelty. Remember, you have Amazon Prime. You can get the free two day shipping and you will have plenty of time to read reviews and make this very important decision because your kids are in summer "camp" which is actually just another word for school in the summer because OH MY GOD you were so tired that day you had to have them home all day with you and you couldn't go to your restorative flow class at yoga. And that was also the day something went terribly wrong with the homemade glitter cloud dough recipe that was supposed to go in their sensory bin and the very same day that they were out of soy milk at Starbucks and you had to immediately email corporate to let them know that duh, they should actually be selling almond milk and/ or coconut milk. Get with it Starbucks. Soy is so 90s.  Ugh, but you digress. The tiffin. The bento boxes...

2. One Week Later: The bento boxes and tiffins have arrived. So has your childrens' school's annual list of school supplies that you must purchase and deliver. It is three and a half pages long.  It includes a ten pound bag of flour and several cleaning products and also requests a Costco-sized package of toilet paper.

3. Begin frantic online search for backpacks and school bags made from all natural materials yet still "cool." Have them monogrammed.


4. Take kids shopping at the mall for new school clothes. Buy them each a completely new wardrobe from Gymboree and Crew Cuts. Spend $2,387.07 on your credit card.


5. Take children to the child psychologist to prepare them mentally for the difficult transition to a new grade, new teacher and new classroom.

6. Intently study the allergy list the school has sent you which lists all the items that other children in your children's classes are allergic to and thus cannot be sent in your child's lunch either. This is extremely stressful because the last thing you (or anyone) wants to be responsible for is sending a second grader into anaphylactic shock. Make notes on your phone so you can remember what not to buy when you go to Whole Foods.

7.  Purchase school supplies for your children. Not to be confused with the 3 1/2 page list of classroom supplies you are also responsible for. They will need paper, pens, folders, notebooks, a calligraphy set, fifteen new apps for their tablets, a graphing calculator, a scalpel, an electron microscope and a centrifuge.

8. Go to Whole Foods to shop for school lunch items. This will take 4 hours and 15 minutes because you have to read every single label to make sure you are purchasing organic, locally sourced, non-GMO, gluten-free, allergy friendly products. You come home with tahini, bananas and a package of brown rice cakes. You somehow spent $76.19.

10. The night before the first day of school prepare the bento boxes. Fill containers with organic, local strawberries intricately cut into the shapes of  sea creatures. Include homemade, nut free granola made with certified gluten-free oats. Make a sandwich on vegan hemp bread out of tahini, kale and jicama. Form it into the shape of your child's favorite Disney character. Make flowers out of non-dairy cheese slices, olives and seaweed. Photograph the finished Bento Box and post it to Instagram.

 11. Write your child an encouraging note which includes an inspirational quote.

12. Include a sheet of stickers for good measure.

13. Fill a Siig bottle with filtered water and also include a box of chilled coconut water in the Bento Box because children can never be too hydrated. Ever.

14. Blog about this experience. Pray it goes viral and is picked up by HuffPo.


15. Get up at four in the morning on the first day of school. Make first day of school signs for each child to hold as you photograph them on the front step. Make a bunting to hang above the front door. Blow up balloons. Actually, go ahead and make a full on back to school photo booth.



16. Make pancakes in the shape of the letters of the alphabet.

17. Dress kids in coordinated outfits and spend 35 minutes posing and photographing them (with your phone).

18. Load everyone into the car to drive them to school.

19. When they are safely in their new classrooms, return to your car to cry for the next 20 minutes. But it's okay, really. You'll be back in six hours to pick them up and drive them to Synchronized Swimming, Cello and Urdu classes this afternoon. 

893 comments:

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Anonymous said...

I went to school in the 60's. Most got saddle shoes and 2 dresses our parents picked out and Monday thru Sunday underwear. That's it. My father gave me his office supplies from work. I carried a sack lunch and ate what I got or you didn't eat. I rode my bicycle to school. No pictures on my first day and got one picture of year at school taken. I noticed I work the same dress a couple years in a row because they bought it big to begin with. There were no credit cards, no cell phones, no computers and not even a calculator because they were the size of a shoe box. We played outside and made up games and love it. If you don't have it, you don't miss it. I have grandchildren now and it really seems pretty stressful to go through all of that to get an education. We used our imagination and our curriculum was more challenging than today by far.

Anonymous said...

DDT was horrible for bird eggs and nearly destroyed entire species. I think that matters.

Anonymous said...

I lucked out and was spared lung cancer... my mom didn't smoke, she drank while we were shopping. Because in the 70's being a drunk mom on the road in the Vista Cruiser was OK. How I miss those days.

Anonymous said...

Oh My Heavens, after reading all the posts above I am so thankful I went to school in the 40's and 50's. Changes have certainly occurred since the "good old days" Didn't hurt me one little bit or my mom. Never needed pills to settle down, sleep, money worries, etc. We even lived just fine with no cell phones (wow) in fact, most homes had no TV to watch when they got home from school. Oh well, we all got through it and still living to a pretty good age!! Have fun you young'uns your kids will make it!! :) Anonymos

Anonymous said...

Firstly, in many school systems it's not a request, but a requirement with respect to the supply list. Secondly, only anachronistic morons shop at Sears.

Grandma Arizona said...

They forgot to add the Visa Prepaid Debit Card..

Anonymous said...

Yes to the assembly-line style sandwich production. Wonder Bread, lined up all along the counter. Baloney, processed cheese-like product. Mayo only for the older kids. Cut-Rite wax paper bags flu of Charlie's potato chips, twisted shut without a twisty. Twinkie if Mom remembered to hide them from us, apple if not. Plaid or Fireball XLT metal lunchbox -- no matching thermos bottle, cuz the Milk Boys brought the tiny cartons of milk into the classroom at 11 every morning (the losers had white milk, the rest of us, chocolate). Lucky Milk Boys missed Arithmetic class while girls had to sit there. Dad was already out the door to the office. If Mom had time to put down her Salem, she might grab the Brownie or the new Polaroid and snap a shot of us in our new school shoes, but no evidence of that exists today. No carpool, no bus, seven-year-olds walking across highway exit ramps with nine-year old orange-belted patrols looking too cool. Crisp, blue, Fall air. And eight new Crayons, not for sharing.

Anonymous said...

I got a huge laugh out of it.

Anonymous said...

To this day I hate, hate, hate peas because of the canned peas they served us in school. The smell of them in school was enough to make me barf. I went in the sixties and there were no children with allergies that I knew of, which makes me wonder about the air quality, etc. otherwise, why are so many children sick? There was one new outfit for school, brown paper bags for book covers, and we ate what the school gave us, my mom wasn't into making lunches. The one fun thing they forgot was the drills for atom bombs where we all lined up, went into the hallway, sat down, and put our heads way down so we could kiss our butts goodbye. BUT, it was the best time in the world to grow up, we were outside from breakfast to dinner, roamed the woods, played at each other's houses and it was a great time. I feel sorry for today's kids, alone in their rooms with a computer and television, and probably feeling lonely as heck. We had the best childhood!!!

Anonymous said...

ugh... really?

Anonymous said...

It certainly doesn't need to be so damn ridiculous. What is it a competition for the parents? Does it really have to be so extravagant? It's school for Christ sakes it's a necessity to carry on in life. ... so just focus on the basics. Plus all the new allergies kids are getting is beyond me. .... we were fed everything under the sun growing up and there's few ppl in my generation with ridiculous allergies. ....
ppl back in the 70 80 90 ..... they were happier. Everything was a lot simpler. We should try to be that way again

Anonymous said...

The 70's were the best days of my life. I remember we waved goodbye to our parents as we parted for the day, kids now days shoot their parents the finger, mine would have been cut off.

Anonymous said...

Had the same brown bag lunch in the 70's, but I had to bring said brown bag back home everyday to be used again!

Cherdo said...

Say in your best Renee Zellweger voice: "YOU HAD ME AT BALONEY."

Anonymous said...

This is so true. As one who grew up back in the 70's and 80's life was a little simpler then and we had a blast. Kids these days have no clue. Like today, as well as back then, most commercials were geared to kids. The difference is that, parents then were not afraid to stand up and tell the kids no, these days so many parents give in to their kids. And also back then the politicians didn't "pad" their pockets so much, and actually let the schools have a budget. As the author states, back then school supplies were, 3 ring notebook paper or sprial bound notebooks, pencil/pen, and that was it. And we didn't have to lug around 20 pounds of books all day either, go to your locker, get the book and notebook for that class and go learn, next class, same procedure. Anyways, thanks for the memories.

Anonymous said...

Got me right at lunch--I remember asking for baloney on white bread for an entire year.Don't know how we survived to tell the tale...

Anonymous said...

The kids who have been "homeschooled" and then brought back to school when the parents can't handle it are at least 2-3 years behind when they come to my class.

Anonymous said...

I had a poncho...and a few years later my friends and I would ride our bikes (no helmets, of course, and no hands whenever possible) to the Gap to get some super-cool Big Bell bottom jeans...

Anonymous said...

haha even in homeschooling you don't always get away scot-free...I bought my self a $500 microscope, of which my parents ended up paying $300. Granted, I intend to use it all my life. I'm going to be a vet.

Anonymous said...

My 70's was nothing like this. Not a lot of money for back to school stuff, barely anything new. Mostly hand-me-downs. No lunch box, had a free lunch card instead since we were poor. Shopped at K-mart, Sears & Penny's were too upscale. No fancy book bags, book covers etc. Paper grocery bags for the book covers, a book bag that lasted for years. No going out to eat because we couldn't, "Afford it." Parents were at least intelligent enough to not smoke. I definitely prefer today's getting ready for school but don't care for all of the supplies I am supposed to be buying not only for my own but for other's kids as well.

Anonymous said...

100% true here in the Midwest.

Anonymous said...

If I could only share this with my wife.... if I did I would either be sleeping alone for a week or getting an ear full for three days about how they only are little once and you need to enjoy every moment you have with them.... Are they, you or I dying tomorrow....????

Anonymous said...

thank god I went to school in the 50s, when food and shoes were extras,

Betty Echols said...

Hmsc, can't remember how to spell it....
Yes that is so true of today's kids and what the parents go through.

Anonymous said...

I had it even better. I started school in the 60's, and it was even much simpler then. I hate to imagine how much more complicated this world will become.

Anonymous said...

Slightly exaggerated ... but not so slightly for some parents. Glad we homeschool, too! ;)

Cjko said...

All the kids who were home schooled and then transferred to our school were behind and never caught up. They were always at the bottom of the class. It was a private school though. So I don't have the best opinion of home schooling. It all depends on the parent I'm sure

Anonymous said...

Yes..the 50's and 60's were a different time. We got what we got in our lunch. I remember a lot of peanut butter and jam. If we wanted a drink we got it from the water fountain in the hall and if we were lucky enough to get an apple or banana..we ate it. We used a paper bag to carry our lunch and were know to trade sandwiches with our friends. A different time? YES!

Anonymous said...

Good job Thank god, I went to school in the 70's and 80's...
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Anonymous said...

eat whatever the hell you want as long as long as you aren't allergic to it. if you listen to everyone there isn't one thing that's any good for you, and everything gives you cancer. for the record i eat whole eggs, whole milk, and whole wheat. i'm 60 and i look 50 and feel 40, fat free and trim. my first days of school in the 60's were much like the 70's example but without the wonder bread or bologna. pbj or spaghetti and meatball sandwiches were our norm, the latter my mom's invention and the finest sandwich ever! and how fat you are is almost always a function of how much you eat and how little you do, calories in, calories out. it's a math equation and any fat woman who suffers from pcos, whatever that is, is welcome to try to 'knock me out', a very mature attitude.

Ashley Smith said...

This made me laugh!

Anonymous said...

This blurb had me laughing uncontrollably (internally) and shifting uncomfortably in my chair. I am so guilty of the majority of the 2014 infractions. Which reminds me, I hadn't thought of a first day of school photo both and sign... Also, I'd like to point out that the author overlooked another thing under 2014: personalized name stickers (which Plum District is having a one-day special on). You can even personalize the labels to look like your kid, which I, of course, would know nothing about. Sharpies and label makers are just too practical!

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jane @ See Jane Learn said...

LOVE THIS! I was that 70's girl!! Thankful my kids are in college and beyond so I missed a bit of what you Mamas deal with today. Thanks for starting my morning off with a laugh!

Anonymous said...

OMG! I'm glad that I'm a great grandmother and survived my children's school years!

Jeff B. said...

Does everyone in your family have long hair? Do you listen to LPs instead of CDs? Do you not have a computer? (Well, I think we know the answer to that one.) Does *Jonathan Livingston Seagull* have a prime spot on your bookshelf? Do your kids spend as much time as possible glued to the TV?

Anonymous said...

I remember back in the 70's, we didn't have cheese slices that were wrapped. They usually sat in the meat drawer unwrapped without any covering and they would start to harden around the corners and edges so no one liked eating the last few slices.

Anonymous said...

"there's few ppl in my generation with ridiculous allergies. ....
ppl back in the 70 80 90 ..... they were happier. Everything was a lot simpler. We should try to be that way again"

Exactly. In the 90's we all just decided to stop being happy and start our children should start having "ridiculous allergies" that could kill them if they touched them. What selfish jerks we were! (Or wait, maybe that was the corporations that started using GMOs, pesticides, BVA plastics, and preservatives in the '90s that caused it). Some people's ignorance astounds me.

Anonymous said...

Great post! As an educator, I have seen the shift over the years in first day of school traditions... so funny.

Anonymous said...

love, discipline and good work ethic is all you need to raise good kids.
Kids now a days are spoiled, undisciplined and do not know how to work since their Mothers do most of the work.
My kids all knew how to clean house and cook by age 12, they live in their own homes and never have a problem finding jobs.
They are never allowed to come back home unless they are going to school.
Kids need to be kicked out of the home by the time they hit 21 especially if they are not going to school.
As parents we have done our part and it is their turn to teach their kids the right way to raise kids. They have some how forgot and I hate
ti see my spoiled grandchildren even visit.

Anonymous said...

I got as far as the "Sanka with Sweet and Lo" before becoming eternally grateful I live in 2014! I did get a good laugh, especially about saving the grocery bags to make textbook covers…I remember doing that.

Dick Berggren said...

I would post one for the 30's if I could just remember. I do remember we had to start wearing shoes again. Don't think they were new.

Anonymous said...

But, it sure is true that HS parents sure love to pat themselves on the back. Why can't your choice just be your choice and accept that others have made different choices? I think thou dost protest too much sometimes.

And, yes, this is exaggerated for humorous effect. Our kids' school lists are longer than ours were and do usually include things like Kleenex and wipes for the classroom, but we also do not do special "school" clothes shopping. Kids grow year-round, so I never understood the concept of buying them a new wardrobe once a year. I buy mine clothes when they outgrow the last ones.

Anonymous said...

The grass is always greener . . . I love the language you guys use to discuss packed vs. school lunches. My perspective comes from the opposite direction - my lunch was almost always the type of packed lunch described in the post here. On rare and special occasions, I *got to* get a hot lunch at school. Of course, looking back, I realize those school lunches were not high quality and perhaps I lucked out, but at the time, what I couldn't have is all I wanted. Funny.

Anonymous said...

As one who went to school in the 60s, I sure had to lug around 20 lbs of books! And a thick 3-ring notebook. No backpacks then. Didn't you ever have homework?! My kids have a school-issued laptop with all their texts online. All essays are written online and turned in online. Yes, this is a public school district in Colorado--not a private school. All high school students in the district have a laptop (and they rarely go to their lockers)--cheaper than buying new textbooks all the time.

RxRph said...

Thank you for the good read. This was funny yet a bit sad at the present we are in.

Anonymous said...

Did you copy this post from Scary Mommy? http://www.scarymommy.com/back-to-school-the-70s-vs-today/

Anonymous said...

If you don't have celiac disease, which is rare, avoiding gluten is just another trendy, Chicken-Little panic. People have been eating gluten for many thousands of years.

Anonymous said...

We would have starved without peanut butter and jam sandwiches, (Canadians say jam), I went to school in the 60's and 70's,
even better! You forgot saying the Lord's Prayer every morning and singing G-d Save The Queen. (Canadian), and what about
getting the belt from the principal. There were good times and bad. Certainly, a lot cheaper.Glad my kids are grown up, except
that college can bankrupt you. Oh well......

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Anonymous said...

Went to school in 70-80's that when they had disciple in the school and kids showed respect ,now days kids cuss teachers there's not any thing done about it ... They use to be able to spank kids (instead of the color chart for punishment ) they needed it now say its considered "carpal punishment" if they spank a kid mmm Never hurt us ...There are alot of changes threw the years and i do love this article lol

Anonymous said...

At least a couple of the negative comments seemed to be directed at the author's comments on allergies, which baffles me. Most were directed back at a few genuinely mean comments on people with allergies, but I think the author worded the sections where she discusses allergies perfectly. It *is* something you're doing to be caring towards others, and I'm sure it's also stressful to account for "one more thing" (or perhaps several more things, that also happen to be extremely common food ingredients).

Anonymous said...

This is so true! We have about had it with the 3 page lists... Kleenex-3 boxes-wet wipes etc...for a fourth grader.. 25 pencils, dry erase markers...etc etc all to be thrown in a community bin in the classroom and nothing returned at the end of the year...where does it all go..

Anonymous said...

I love this as a child of the 70s, and not a Mom. Makes me ask why? Why? Why? Maybe don't spend more than $50 on each child for clothes, shop at KMart as our Mom's did. We weren't happy either. But instead of giving in and letting us call the shots Mom just dealt out the "lots of kids don't have as much as you" and the "if you don't like these clothes we can just get nothing instead" speeches. Followed by the "if your friend jumped off a cliff...." speech when we insisted that we had to have the same brand jeans as our friends, or life would be ruined for us.
But, something unique happened to us when Mom dealt out this wisdom : we learned to deal with life situations, disappointments, and how to be happy just being me. . . Times will always change, but some things maybe shouldn't.

Paul Shugrue said...

Sanka for breakfast? Anathema!

Jenny Aegerter said...

oh gosh...thank you for this laugh and blast from my past. Born in 75, these things are true. what about "tang" orange drink in the thermos?
Dr. Scholl's wooden sole clogs and those socks with the pom pom on the ankle.
Yes, the bologna and tuna fish sandwiches were fine until lunch.

Anonymous said...

I am more like the 70's mom lol minus the massive school supply list, gotta get those of course.

Anonymous said...

i remember almost every day bologna sandwiches on wonder bread with miracle whip or mayo, fritos, milk, no icepack inside a donny & marie lunchbox. I had the metal donny and marie first and then a year or so later a plastic one in hip new style. Those metal lunch boxes always had a certain smell. I'll never forget it.

Anonymous said...

I grew up in the 90s and they weren't that different from the 70s. we only had one kid in our entire school that was allergic to peanuts and we could still take PB&J for lunch as long as we washed our hands after we were done, especially since her sister was in my class

Anonymous said...

"why would you take Arabic classes in the USA?"

Really? You're asking that?
Why would you take Spanish or French classes in the USA? Perhaps because being multi-lingual is an advantage. Anywhere.

Anonymous said...

Corduroy... I think corduroy is to blame.
That 'phwit phwit' sound when you walked in corduroy...we must protect our children from this

Anonymous said...

I am thankful that I went to school in the 50's and 60's and my kids went in the 70's and 80's. I can ignore my grandkids!

Barbara said...

Just let us enjoy the post and get off the bandbox. Geez.

Anonymous said...

Because just being near an allergen can trigger a fatal reaction to some kids. My grandson included.

Anonymous said...

To the ignorant commenter above, one's children might take any number of languages here in the USA, if one wants them to be well-rounded, cultured, and competitive in business. In this case, the person even stated that one parent is Pakistani. The article actually mentions Urdu, which is more prominent in Pakistan, but Arabic is likely to be more useful worldwide (thought dialects vary considerably). Would you question them for taking Spanish or Chinese, whether they had family who spoke it or not? Get your head out of the clouds.

Anonymous said...

I had the Pigs in Space lunchbox. It was the most awesome birthday gift ever from my grandma (until I got a cassette tape player a few years later). I loved it and was so excited for school to start because I'd never had a metal lunch box like the other kids - we got brown bags, wheat bread and plaid thermoses and were considered weirdos). Then the first day of school came and all the other kids had the fancy new plastic lunch boxes with Snoopy and Scooby Doo. By Christmas my lunch box had a rust stain in the shape of an uneaten apple and I was back firmly into weirdo status.

Anonymous said...

Crazy... I think my kids are living in the 70's lol.... Well minus the peanut butter... Im not allowed pb at our school, so I do have to watch that.

Anonymous said...

Because having nuts in your kids lunch can cause another kid to get really sick/possibly die. We're not talking about food intolerance, which just makes you feel bad, but allergy, which can cause anaphylactic shock. Not really fair to people who like nuts, but that's the way it is. Some people are so sensitive that just smelling the allergen can cause a reaction.

Anonymous said...

This just totally cracked me up - love it! Great idea :-)

pattii55 said...

Anonymous #4 above hit it dead on. Things are more complicated, supplies are ridiculous for the escalated taxes we pay, (I too had to buy TOILET PAPER for one grade) and you have to worry about everybody besides your own kid. I'm so glad my Step-Son graduated last year. Life was far easier with "needs" and requirements more straightforward and logical in the 50's, 60's and 70's. No wonder parents and kids are less mentally stable now, the world is illogical. Things get more ridiculous every day.

Anonymous said...

I went to school in the 50s and schools did not have cafeterias so we all walked home for an hour lunch break and then walked back to school. We also did not have Kindergartens till much later. We had first - eighth grade and then on to four years of high school. Those were really the relaxing good old days.

Anonymous said...

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Valerie Hartzer said...

Some of us still do it as close to 1970sas possible, dollar store for plastic character lunch containers, Target for classroom supplies, ToysR us for backpack and lunch box set, pepperoni, string cheese, goldfish crackers and fruit twist lunch...you can still keep it simple and cheap you just have to be more creative now.

Christy Monge said...

Laughing hysterically! Thank you for the great post!

Anonymous said...

Communism

Sabina Zobel said...

Because kids always have to try what their friends have... or do

Anonymous said...

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matriarch918 said...

I see a lot of "yay, the good old 70's" in the comments. Maybe this was not the author's intentions, but I don't know why you're so proud of that descriptor. Yes the 70's mom spent less and more wisely where she could. The present day mom is required to purchase a ton more by the schools or their children suffer the consequences. That is about where "yay, 70's ends". The present day mom went through a lot of trouble to care for children in every way. She loved her children and did the best she could for them as she understood it. She liked her children. The 70's mom at every stop was just doing what she had to so she could finally kick those little nuisances out the door to school and have the rest of the day to herself. All her decision were made for her convenience, not her children's care. If I could pick a mom to be raised by or a mom to be, I'm picking present day mom every time.

Anonymous said...

My daughter balked at buying all the stuff on the list this year, as did about 3/4 of the parents in the school system here. She was to buy TEN (10) hand sanitizers! TEN (10) boxes of tissues! And these were just the minor things. She bought 2 of each of these, and enough of the other things on the list for her daughter. She also kept 90% of it home and sent a note to the teacher and principal that she would send another along when her DAUGHTER needed it, not for a kid whose parents won't step up and buy for their own!!

Kathy W. said...

OMG (sorry), I meant to say how NEATO! Born in 64 and so a definitely child of the 70's, I LOVE your post! Thank you for bringing a smile to my face and a yearning in my heart for the "old days."

Anonymous said...

What, you didn't read the posts directly above yours? If breathing the allergen in the air can kill, just how "cautious" do you want them to be -- stop breathing?? Sheesh!

anna christine said...

I think that if we time traveled to the early seventies the biggest culture shock besides what everything cost would be that everyone smoked everywhere. Doctors in doctors offices, hospitals, stores, banks.. everywhere all the time and no one said a word about it. Ever notice there are still (sealed off ) ashtrays on airplanes ? Just think how old those planes are ! I remember going to the store for my moms cigarettes and paying 10 cents for them. No ID required.

Anonymous said...

If my kid had a true life-threatening allergy, they would be homeschooled. Not a class full of students' parents to adjust their kids lunches to keep.MY kid safe. I wouldn't hide my child's allergy from them and pretend they don't have one to avoid them knowing they are different. They need to be able to self protect and they cant if the entire world caters to them. I am NOT the 2014 mom. I took first day of schoool pox but didn't go into debt over the btw shopping. I am not their friend. I am their mom. They are old enough to make their own damnable lunch and a little processes lunch meat wont kill them!

Anonymous said...

Me too with Shaun Cassidy and bell bottoms!!

Anonymous said...

Me too with the Shaun Cassidy shirt and bell bottoms!

Anonymous said...

Went to school in the seventies....lived in a poor rural area.no lunch box,Free Lunch,no new wardrobe,one new outfit... Had to share that with Sister!...Tough Times...but...Better Times!

Anonymous said...

unfortunately home schoolers have no social skills.

Anonymous said...

The fear of food allergies is less about the intentionally eaten food and more the other risks.. Some kids are so allergic that even talking to someone after they eat a peanut butter sandwich (without brushing after) can result in a reaction. My son's best friend is highly allergic to peanuts and that can be a real risk.

Anonymous said...

Last time I checked... isn't it spelled "bologna"?

Anonymous said...

Last time I checked, isn't it spelled "bologna"?

Anonymous said...

Glad I went to school when you HAD to behave well, and when complaining about a teacher got you in big trouble at home.

Anonymous said...

Dukes of Hazard came out in 79 and cheeseballs, cheeseballs and other shapes were invented in the 30s. We did have them in the 70s.

Anita said...

Oh yea, someone mentioned how their Mom never packed lunches in the 70s, but had them buy theirs. School lunches rocked in the 70s! There was that square pizza!!!! That thing was sooooo good. Much better than the pizza they have today. For a short period of time, my Mom was a lunch lady and she had that recipe and would make it for us from time to time on the weekends. In my very early years (grades k - 2) I went to schools where you had to back a lunch. What about those glass thermoses! Those things would constantly shatter if you dropped your lunch box or banged it against something too hard. And yet millions of young children were sent on their merry way with those hazardous thermoses.

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