Sunday, August 24, 2014

Back to School: The 70s vs. Today, A Lot has Changed

Back to School in the 70s

1. Take the kids downtown to go shopping at Sears for back to school clothes the last week of August. Get everyone a new pair of corduroys and a striped tee shirt. Buy the boys a pair of dungarees and the girls a pair of culottes. No, Jennifer, you can't have that orange and red poncho. Promise you will crochet her a better one with much more fringe. Get the girls a package of that rainbow, fuzzy yarn they like in their hair. You are done. You have spent a total of $43.00. Now take everyone to the Woolworth's lunch counter for grilled cheeses and chocolate milk.




2. On the night before the first day of school (that would be the Sunday night after Labor Day, of course, you know, mid-September) throw the kids in the way back of the station wagon and drag them downtown to Eckerds, K-Mart, Ames, Dollar General, Drug Fair or the like and hurry them over to the back-to-school area to pick out a lunchbox. Make sure to tell them get a move on because you don't have all night for them to make a damn decision. They need to get in bed by eight and yes, they're going to miss the Wonderful World of Disney if they can't decide between The Fonz and Dukes of Hazzard. Good Lord, why is it so hard for them to pick? Tell Kimberly if she can't make up her mind between Holly Hobbie and The Bionic Woman then you're going to pick Pigs in Space and you don't want to hear another word about it until June. Grab a composition book for each of them and a pack of pencils too. That's all they need. Remember to save some grocery bags so they can cover their textbooks with them after the first day of school.


3. Buy yourself a pack of Virginia Slims on the way out and smoke three of them on the way home.

4. Get up in the morning and make yourself a cup of Sanka with Sweet 'n' Low. Line up all the lunchboxes on the formica counter top in your kitchen. Open up a bag of Wonder Bread and do this assembly line style.

5. Spread yellow mustard on bread. Slap baloney on bread. Unwrap American cheese slices and put on top of baloney. Put top on the sandwich and wrap sandwich in tin foil or wax paper. Put it in the lunchbox. Every kid gets the same exact lunch. Period.

6. Alternate sandwich choices could include: peanut butter and grape jelly, peanut butter and marshmallow fluff, the end of last night's leftover roast beef or the ever popular with children tuna fish with large chunks of onions and celery and Miracle Whip.

7. Put some Planter's Cheese Balls into a baggie and close with a twist tie.

8. Take Twinkies out of the box. Put one in each child's lunch box.

9. Fill Thermoses with either Kool-Aid or whole milk.

10. Include a red delicious apple even though you know that damned apple is just going to come home uneaten again, which is fine because you can keep adding the same one until it practically rots.



11. Close the lunchboxes. You're done. Go put some Barry Manilow on the record player and celebrate that your kids are out of the house until dinner time. They'll grab them, along with a frosted, dutch apple Pop-Tart on the way out the door as they walk a half mile down the road to get to the bus stop.

Back to School 2014

1. Take five deep breaths and say a positive affirmation. School begins in two weeks. It is the middle of July. Don't worry, you still have time to order BPA-free bento boxes and authentic Indian tiffins made with special stainless steel that did not involve any child-labor, sweat shops or animal cruelty. Remember, you have Amazon Prime. You can get the free two day shipping and you will have plenty of time to read reviews and make this very important decision because your kids are in summer "camp" which is actually just another word for school in the summer because OH MY GOD you were so tired that day you had to have them home all day with you and you couldn't go to your restorative flow class at yoga. And that was also the day something went terribly wrong with the homemade glitter cloud dough recipe that was supposed to go in their sensory bin and the very same day that they were out of soy milk at Starbucks and you had to immediately email corporate to let them know that duh, they should actually be selling almond milk and/ or coconut milk. Get with it Starbucks. Soy is so 90s.  Ugh, but you digress. The tiffin. The bento boxes...

2. One Week Later: The bento boxes and tiffins have arrived. So has your childrens' school's annual list of school supplies that you must purchase and deliver. It is three and a half pages long.  It includes a ten pound bag of flour and several cleaning products and also requests a Costco-sized package of toilet paper.

3. Begin frantic online search for backpacks and school bags made from all natural materials yet still "cool." Have them monogrammed.


4. Take kids shopping at the mall for new school clothes. Buy them each a completely new wardrobe from Gymboree and Crew Cuts. Spend $2,387.07 on your credit card.


5. Take children to the child psychologist to prepare them mentally for the difficult transition to a new grade, new teacher and new classroom.

6. Intently study the allergy list the school has sent you which lists all the items that other children in your children's classes are allergic to and thus cannot be sent in your child's lunch either. This is extremely stressful because the last thing you (or anyone) wants to be responsible for is sending a second grader into anaphylactic shock. Make notes on your phone so you can remember what not to buy when you go to Whole Foods.

7.  Purchase school supplies for your children. Not to be confused with the 3 1/2 page list of classroom supplies you are also responsible for. They will need paper, pens, folders, notebooks, a calligraphy set, fifteen new apps for their tablets, a graphing calculator, a scalpel, an electron microscope and a centrifuge.

8. Go to Whole Foods to shop for school lunch items. This will take 4 hours and 15 minutes because you have to read every single label to make sure you are purchasing organic, locally sourced, non-GMO, gluten-free, allergy friendly products. You come home with tahini, bananas and a package of brown rice cakes. You somehow spent $76.19.

10. The night before the first day of school prepare the bento boxes. Fill containers with organic, local strawberries intricately cut into the shapes of  sea creatures. Include homemade, nut free granola made with certified gluten-free oats. Make a sandwich on vegan hemp bread out of tahini, kale and jicama. Form it into the shape of your child's favorite Disney character. Make flowers out of non-dairy cheese slices, olives and seaweed. Photograph the finished Bento Box and post it to Instagram.

 11. Write your child an encouraging note which includes an inspirational quote.

12. Include a sheet of stickers for good measure.

13. Fill a Siig bottle with filtered water and also include a box of chilled coconut water in the Bento Box because children can never be too hydrated. Ever.

14. Blog about this experience. Pray it goes viral and is picked up by HuffPo.


15. Get up at four in the morning on the first day of school. Make first day of school signs for each child to hold as you photograph them on the front step. Make a bunting to hang above the front door. Blow up balloons. Actually, go ahead and make a full on back to school photo booth.



16. Make pancakes in the shape of the letters of the alphabet.

17. Dress kids in coordinated outfits and spend 35 minutes posing and photographing them (with your phone).

18. Load everyone into the car to drive them to school.

19. When they are safely in their new classrooms, return to your car to cry for the next 20 minutes. But it's okay, really. You'll be back in six hours to pick them up and drive them to Synchronized Swimming, Cello and Urdu classes this afternoon. 

893 comments:

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Anonymous said...

me too!!!
thanks for the post..gonna show this to my adult kids...

Anonymous said...

We had it better in the 70's. Period.

Anonymous said...

SO relieved I don't (and never will) have kids!!

Eva Hermacinski said...

Oh! NOT TO BE YOUNG AGAIN!!

Anonymous said...

In response to those that think home schooled children are the 'smart ones'. Working in a post secondary admissions office, I've seen home schooled HS transcripts with misspelled words, grammatical errors and poor sentence structure. Who prepared the transcripts? The parent who was the teacher! Not always the brightest bulbs!

Anonymous said...

Thank Goodness that part of my life is over, My mom sent 7 kids to school daily. I survived my two sons in the 80's and 90's, Now it's the grandchildren in Kindegarten and second grade. Their moms can handle this new wave crap. BTW, my grandson loves bologna. With the cheese puffs and the apple that always manages to squish the sandwich. Happy days are gone. But the memories are wonderful.

Anonymous said...

My dad gave me about 75 cents to buy lunch. And bitched about it endlessly. I waked to the bus. And back. Rain snow or hail up hill. True story.

Anonymous said...

"Schools do try to keep kids with life threatening allergies alive, but that hardly seems awful to me???"

Yeah, because no child survived school lunch before the special snowflake generation started sending their precious spawn to school embedded in lucite cubes.

Anonymous said...

This has me in stitches, spot on 70's . Hey, I loved those grilled cheese sandwiches at Woolworth :) I watched my daughter prepare my grand daughter for 5th grade this year, What a nightmare! My daughter had to help her carry everything in because it took her backpack and a small box. Life used to be so simple :)

Alderin said...

Steve, for me, buying organic is not about my health or the health of my family, but the health of the planet.

Farms CAN function at current capacities without resorting to clouds of pesticides killing all the bees or refined chemical fertilizers polluting the water. Use of refined chemical fertilizers are similar to making a person live on sugar-water and multivitamins: you'll live and be fairly energetic, but you won't thrive. This is part of why organic fruits and veggies taste better. The organic "replacements" are easily, locally sourced and not harder to work with, and often cheaper if a farm does a little diversification (been there, done that, just not full-time). Sustainability is the goal, which means longer life for everyone.

I'm on the fence about GMOs personally. We finally have the technology and ability to change how things grow! Change what vitamins, minerals, and other compounds are in the plants we farm! That's AMAZING! But, what effect will those plants have in the wild? What errors in judgement or mistakes in labs might happen? There is research going into plants that provide their own pesticides, and there are already weed-killer-resistant plants being sold. The worst I've heard is about GMO seeds being sold that grow plants that cannot produce growable seeds, and the sold seeds rot in a year. No stockpile, no recovery, and what happens if the company decides not to sell them next year, or raises the price prohibitively? What happens if somehow these pollinate normal crops, and suddenly there are no more seeds for our food crops? So, yeah, I'm excited about the amazing helpful and prosperous possibilities of GMO, and scared of the corporate profit-at-all-costs possibilities that are likely. Thus: on the fence.

I got off track, the point was that eating organic doesn't equal personal health, but it does improve the health of our planet.

Buying local doesn't improve personal finances, but it does improve the financial situation of one's community.

I totally agree that we all need to get off these electronic things more often, and that is coming from an IT guy and programmer. :-)

Anonymous said...

Field trip days cold lunch included a shasta soda wrapped in tin foil, did it really help keep it cold?

Anonymous said...

What are these kids going to do when they get into the real world? Are they going to dictate what their colleagues at work can and can't eat, too? Are they going to insist that their college campus become nut/gluten/dairy/egg free? At some point, they are going to have to learn how to function in society with people who do not have food allergies instead of expecting the world to bend over backwards for them. It's one thing to make reasonable accommodations (like a peanut free table in the lunch room). But when your kid's allergy requires you dictating what everyone else can and can't feed their kids, it becomes unreasonable. When you mandate that a school ban peanut products, you're not "asking people around you to help." You are demanding that they base their child's diet around your child's limitations. That's not a reasonable accommodation. You have every right to keep your child in a totally controlled environment - your home - with homeschooling, if such an environment is truly necessary. When you make the choice to send them to school, you are choosing to put your child in a situation where you don't get to control what everyone else does, eats, and buys.

Anonymous said...

Did anyone's mom actually get up with them in 70's? It was cold cereal and catch the bus, hope you didn't miss it or she would chase it down in her purple bathrobe.

SMB said...

Spot on except there were no individually wrapped cheese slices in the 70a....you had to peel them apart and discard the first alive that had turned dark orange at the edges...if mom wasn't looking

Anonymous said...

ha ha ha......well, growing up in the 70s and a mom in the 80s, 90s, and still now (there is a big age gap) I can say that I feel for the mom's of today...especially the new ones. BUT that is what happens when we've let the TV babysit them and they learn to take in all of the marketing crap as gospel truth.... and then hold each other up to attaining all that through peer pressure. My kids? Like me.....they feed their kids healthy food, but the rest of it? Give yourself a break Mum! Parenthood is NOT a contest!! Let 'em be kids - capable kids who can walk and know about stranger danger and are capable!! Let go of control - for both you and your kids sake!! It's AMAZING how AMAZING your kids are without ALL THE PROGRAMMING! (I italicize not to shout, but to emphasize). Life is meant to be LIVED! Not merely survived! :) ~ciao

Anonymous said...

This was so fun to read! I laughed even more when you got to the bit about blogging about it - hoping it goes viral! Lol - I hope it does. Gotta run, the delivery van of school supplies is in the driveway and I've got to make organic quinoa sushi for the munchkins.

Anonymous said...

Don't be mean about home schoolers, people might need different things but we all want our kids to do well. Luckily all I had to do this year was get my kid some new pants. His school provides supplies and he has the same backpack and lunchbox. I hope everyone has a good year!

Anonymous said...

Wow, being a SAHM is not synonymous with smothering. And laughing at someone's pain? Nice.

Anonymous said...

It's gotten ridiculously out of hand, in my opinion....But what do I know. I'm so out of touch with kids, that, in itself, is funny.

Anonymous said...

Marlboro's and Kool's here!

Anonymous said...

5Going to school in the FIFTIES - "Here's money for HOT LUNCH which you probably won't eat because it's canned green beans with some kind of meat. You can drink the milk." "The school provides all the supplies you'll need, but maybe this year I'll get you a new FOUNTAIN PEN for penmanship." "New clothes? The DRESSES you wore last year still cover your thigh." "Hold your sister's hand when you cross the four lane street." (A
s you walk to school, SANS PARENTS, through the city.) BENEFITS: No excess weight, self sufficiency, and an EXCELLENT New York education. Not saying it was perfect, but certainly easier on parents!

Anonymous said...

Wow, chill out-everybody just eat what you want or need to eat and don't bother everyone about it. Sheesh! This was just a piece about how society has changed.

Anonymous said...

so those generations before you didn't "care" about their kids as much, want them as much, have "emotional" attachment or love them as much? Seriously???. Ridiculous. Children ARE a gift, it's not a concept you invented THIS day & age. Add if you are crying sending you kid that first day, know that many mothers did the same in the 70's. Still SAVE those tears, MUCH more deserving times await ahead for them.
Furthermore, as for "getting it right" ---also don't delude yourself. Reality is, Parents are MUCH more focused on themselves & their needs than generations past my parents & those of my friends often NEVER took time for themselves or went out, they lived for their families. So get over yourself. OH and college cost is called "tuition" not donation. Sure you were trying to be cute play on words but no violin strings for your crazy notions & patting yourself on the back for being SO better than previous generations. I don't know you but strongly suspect you're mistaken!!

Anonymous said...

It's just an article about how society has changed, sheesh. Oh, you want me to say, "Wow, you're such an individual, you are so special, you cannot relate to this one bit!" Feel better?

Anonymous said...

I homeschooled both until high school, and they wouldn't take a lunch, nor buy one. They only drank coffee!

Anonymous said...

Good observation!

Anonymous said...

Re: lunches. Don' t know about anyone else, but my mom PEELED a piece of cheese off the humongous stack... No 'unwrapping' a slice of cheese like we do today. And a special treat was getting potato chips to add to the baloney sandwich! Yum!

Anonymous said...

This is the dumbest thing I've ever read

Anonymous said...

Very funny post! I also wanted to say thank you to all of you who appreciate just how dangerous some of the allergies can be and don't make a stink about keeping other children safe because they aren't yours and it might be an inconvenience. For the person who said that children with severe allergies should be home schooled, that isn't possible for everyone. There are many parents out there who would love to home school their children, but aren't able to for a variety of reasons. And then there is the fact that all children are entitled to a public education, so even parents who could home school, but choose to send their children to public school have the same rights as other parents. The school has to provide a safe learning environment for ALL children. After all, you wouldn't be okay with someone bringing poison in and spraying it around your child's classroom and lunch table, would you? For children with severe allergies, it's the same difference.

ldyplantagenet said...

This is great but one detail is amiss. Change the name Jennifer to Susan or Lisa or Karen. The Jennifers were being born in the 70's, not shopping for ponchos. I was the only Jennifer in my schools from 1969-1981. My mom was a decade ahead of the curve. Otherwise a hilarious comparison!

Anonymous said...

Read the current info on allergies/immune systems, antibiotics and gut microbes. Very interesting. We have been killing off the microbes that help prevent allergies by giving our small children too many doses of antibiotics. Of course many children died without them in the olden days...

Anonymous said...

Why is the today mom a "joke"? Because they don't do exactly what you do? Seems there is quite a bit of judgment in these comments. Sad when you stop and think that these judgmental adults are raising the kids!

CHolland said...

Too Funny! Can definitely relate!

Anonymous said...

Don't forget about the hundreds of dollars you'll have to pay in lab fees for your high school kids in addition to everything else
you just paid for.

Lis said...

...said the anonymous person using the internet.

Anonymous said...

My today sounds like the 70's one, except for the twinkies, and the kids eat the apples.

Anonymous said...

Jim, think about it a little more. In the 70 a those alergy kids died before they got to 1st grade. We didn't talk much about such matters back then.

Anonymous said...

You will need to file the correct form giving you permission to laugh. Then you must make sure that your laughter does not sound too much like gunfire, and that nobody is offended by your laughter.

Anonymous said...

I'm laughing out loud now! Already laughed at the humor of the article but then I read the ridiculous epistles here going on and on about their need for organic and their celiac and etc etc, LOL! You know, the ones who didn't get the joke!

Lis said...

My kids are just about grown but now I wish I'd raised them in a haze of VSML smoke like I was raised. (VSML = Virginia Slim Menthol Lights
Because my momma was a lady.)

To you folks getting all serious and Judgey McStickupyourass: There is NO Mompetition except in your own head. Pipe down. You're harshing everyone else's buzz.

Anonymous said...

I use plastic lunch bags for everything. I teach my kids to throw them all in the water so they can wash into the ocean and be eaten by turtles and fish who subsequently die. /sarcasm off

Seriously, what are you looking for here. Brownie points?

Anonymous said...

Baloney is no worse than chicken nuggets. In fact, the baloney is probably healthier.

Unknown said...

as a long time reader , i'm beginning to see the problem with going viral, that being said i grew up pretty upper class and the school lunches in the 70's at my house were pretty much the same but we had deli ham and cheese, ho hos and cokes wrapped in tinfoil, or we got the small milk for a nickle. i had a monkeys lunch box. through the years we discover that most everything we eat breath and come in contact will cause us some kind of damage and then we discover that maybe it wont. everyone/everthing has something wrong with it/them. this is a humorous post on a mostly humorous blog.please take the bitching somewhere else.

Anonymous said...

I recommend that you go to the emergency room and have them remove the stick from your sphincter.

Anonymous said...

No, she was too busy yelling at us to "MOVE IT!! you're gonna miss the bus if you don't get your butt in gear!!" lol

Redhead 67 said...

The Hamas will be taken to trial.

Anonymous said...

i am SO glad to be done with school, last one graduated just before all the craziness with food really got moving. I definitely was a product of the 60s and 70s, those were my lunches, except my mom always made our desserts(or me once I was old enough to bake by myself). We kids usually got 2 pairs of long pants, a couple tops or shirts, used the same lunchboxes till they wore out, or we used paper bags when we were "too old" for the boxes.

Anonymous said...

This is so hillarious and so true! I can just remember the annual battle of "Why do I have to wear Sears Toughskins jeans, I want Levis."

I think you forgot one important aspect of back to school today: kids can no longer walk by themselves to the bus stop or school; what if they were taken or abused? Or worse, what if they were seen walking by themselves by another parent - that parent would think that I'm irresponsible for letting them go out unaccompanied!

Anonymous said...

As a child of the 70s - 80s this made me nostalgic. And I agree with you. Thank God, I don't have kids either.

Anonymous said...

Oh. My. Word. This is hilarious! Thanks so much for the laugh!

Anonymous said...

Unfortunately, they have.

Kim said...

Loved it! I am feeling slightly ripped off though--I made my own sandwich and she wouldn't buy us the cheese puffs because they weren't good for us!
As for today, mine were both homeschooled/gymschooled(we owned a gym) and I let them cook ramen and spaghetti o's for themselves in the microwave. The mom you are describing does, however, attend the Yin Yoga class I teach midday on Wednesdays.

Anonymous said...

The banning DDT has resulted in the deaths of millions of Africans due to malaria. Sad but true.

Anonymous said...

Hilarious! We also had plenty of fresh fruit available in our lunches. Substitute Tastycake for the Hostess products. But the current frenzy is true.

Anonymous said...

My girls go to a private school in TN...is well worth the money due the state's funding calculation...my biggest issue with them is the right of entitlement...they both need NEED a IPhone 5s, a nice car to drive to school each day and the freedom to try this sport and maybe cheerleading or whatever...class team building weekends, week long trips the WA, DC...and the list goes on...meanwhile, they say they have no time to get a part time job to pay for any of this...its gonna be a rude awakening for them...tough love!!!!

Anonymous said...

This is accurate for working class and middle class 2010s. Parents today overindulge their children, feed off any attention they can get on Twitter and Facebook for validation and panic panic panic over little thing. They hover over their children. Socioeconomic class has nothing to do with it. Upperclass moms can be as overprotective or disinterested in rearing children as I imagine many other women from many other socio backgrounds can.

Anonymous said...

At my 50th birthday party last year, one of the tings on the list of "Things we love about our sister" was my love of ponchos, back in the day!!

Anonymous said...

I'm lucky I don't have kids with allergies but expecting an entire school to make allowances for your child's allergies is seriously unrealistic. To be that afraid I can only assume you never take them to any public venues that serve food such as Six Flags or water parks or restaurants or malls? There is no way that a school or parents of all the kids should have to refrain from sending a list of foods because of another child's allergies. There was a period of time where the only thing my son would eat was peanut butter and jelly. Should he have had to miss lunch because another child had an allergy?

Anonymous said...

Haha!! So true!!

Anonymous said...

Thank you!! Take a chill pill PEOPLE!!!!! It is called HUMOR!

Anonymous said...

Can I share a frustrating thing about our school? My 13 yr old daughter had to sit out of a gym class because she had a sore foot. Why? Because she dances 6 days a week. She was REQUIRED to write an essay on teamwork and hard work on the field/track/court and define terms like exercise, practice, team spirit. She then had to explain why she could not take gym that day and then offer evidence of what physical activity she did to make up for her lost 40 minutes of gym. She submitted all as requested, including the 22 hours of dance she took that week!!! I, as her parent had to sign her essay. Holy cow! My daughter just spent 5 weeks at The School of American Ballet at Lincoln Center this summer (she is now 14) and fittest person I know.

Anonymous said...

Absolutely correct!! Although, back to school shopping would have been Macy's or Mervyn's. We girls were not allowed to wear pants until 1970. And we all looked like Marcia Brady. How come we have all become so retentive??

Anonymous said...

I thank my lucky stars every single day that I was a child of the 70's! Oh, and I don't do the allergy thing. I pack whatever I want in my kid's lunch, mostly peanut butter sandwiches. I figure if your child is allergic, tell them to stay away from other kid's lunches!

Anonymous said...

Exactly - egg salad or tuna with mayo in a hot locker in an un-airconditioned school. Sandwich, 2 cookies, and an apple. every day

Anonymous said...

They are KIDS not princes and princesses. They are supposed to go to school and learn. Part of learning is to be independent and self-reliant/responsible. Kids are very intelligent and capable; just no like experience to draw from. Parents need to let kids be responsible and let kids be a tad uncomfortable from time to time. Spoil them on occasion but for the love of God don't continue with the whole 'entitlement' training. Honestly, a child should have to 'earn' the extras. That is what makes a young person grow to a productive driven adult!

Leslee Paquette said...

When the children control the family and the parents are no longer authority figures... How did things get so upside-down?

Mandi Kumar said...

Do you happen to belong to any of the Desi/Pradesi groups on Facebook?

Anonymous said...

Oh wow that's actually not correct if you Google this and do research you will find it was actually very harmful!!!

Anonymous said...

All I can say is....LOL!! (now off to Google "tiffin" so I can find out WTH it is!!)

Anonymous said...

My daughter is in kindergarten. Aside from packing her a somewhat healthy lunch, I am so glad I am as laid back as parents of the 70's. Kids have survived for thousands of years without bento lunches and coordinating outfits. No wonder my generation and younger are full of brats lol. This was HILARIOUS.

Anonymous said...

anonymous 12:18 a.m: why are you compelled to soil a funny blog post with a hateful comment? that was hurtful and not nice.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous # 2349875 (not to be confused with any of the preceding Anonymi):

I had a Snoopy lunch box and got a little yellow thermos filled with Alpha-getti And yes... milk got really stinky! And I wore Toughskins with reinforced knees and bum so that I could pass them to my little brother which as a girl decidedly pissed me off... but we did get them from Simpson-Sears...

As an aside... how does a funny post (and yes, a bit exaggerated... because its HUMOR and hyperboles are used to generate laughter from time to time) become a forum for debating allergies/GMO/gluten/hormones? SQUIRREL... stick with the program people...

Anonymous said...

WOW! WOW! WOW! This just shows how pathetic our society has become. Bento Box for lunch? some people have too much free time. School in the 70's was awesome and we were allowed to be kids. Why do parents need to feel like they have to be friends with their kids? what model does that send?

No offense but perhaps one should make sure that their own child eats what was made for his or her lunch. when did it become I have to be responsible for your childs issues?

It was so munch simpler in th 70's and 80's when we could show respect to authority, question people, learn by experiences and love AMERICA. This does not exist today. So so sad,

Anonymous said...

Okay...this is what I know...The lady that has parents that are 70 and 77 kudos to you and them...but it isn't because of their eating. It is good genes. Meats that are store bought are loaded with hormones because the animals that were killed to make that meat were loaded with them. As far as veggies and fruits....canned or not canned the ground has a certain amount of toxins in it which the foods are going to get regardless of rather or not people spray them with chemicals. But this WHOLE list of replies is no better then mine seeing how it completely is ignoring the article were posting on LOL Now for my article thoughts:
To the lady that wrote the article...I am a child of the 70's and a teen of the 80's. Way to go on the exaggerations on the clothing price, school supply list and food list. Cause I promise you, if your spending $75.00 or so on 3 food items...organic or not...your shopping in the wrong store LOL...which I would assume is yet another exaggeration. But the article was very funny for what it was.

Anonymous said...

Nailed it, except I don't think parents monogram their kid's backpacks anymore (at least not with first names as shown) . Safety issue.

Anonymous said...

Did you have a computer in the 70"s????

John said...

Try comparing 1920's schooling with 1950's schooling.

Anonymous said...

What school supplies? In the 70's everything was provided, right down to your note books and #2 pencils. At that time if you forgot your lunch the teacher always had a jar of PB&J and a loaf of wonder bread on hand so that no one went hungry ever. The funny thing is we all survived.

latraveler said...

So true for MY kids, but I went to school in the 50's and 60's......

Mrs. Match said...

LOL! I'm a child of the 80s, but a lot of the 70s still rang true. Back to school shopping especially. I think I got a couple new shirts, but usually we went to the Good Will! I also know for a fact that my mom did not take a picture of me on the first day of school. Oh boy do today's parents have it rough. Can I raise my kid in the 70s please??

Ellen said...

I went to school in the '50s. We walked to school by ourselves, even in the city, and walked home for lunch, and the school supplied everything we needed. There was an adult crossing guard for the busy street. No organized after-school activities. Kids lives now are almost unrecognizable, and G
od help parents trying to raise kids in this!

Anonymous said...

I love this post and I sent it out to friends all over. It is hilarious and most of us see ourselves or someone we know somewhere hidden inside these descriptions. For those of you taking it too seriously, chill out. Anonymous: getting in to an argument is just not necessary. Perhaps that is why you stayed "anonymous".

Anonymous said...

+1 for child psychologist reference and +2 for the Urdu reference

I'm a child psychologist with roots in Urdu-speaking Pakistan!

Anonymous said...

Thank you God that I went to school in the 60's and 70's. My parents would roll over in their graves if they would have had to do the things parents do now. Wait a min. They wouldn't know what half the things kids need now for school was. And thank God I don't have kids to send to school.

Anonymous said...

This is GREAT! ...and also why we're going to home school our kids.

Anonymous said...

Man, it must be annoying parents of children with peanut allergies. I mean, always havinh to drive for vacations..never being able to fly with in-flight peanuts anywhere..

Anonymous said...

Did you write this, because the same thing is on the scary mommy blog too.

Anonymous said...

My granddaughter has a severe peanut allergy. They had to leave a baseball game the other day because people were eating peanuts a couple of rows a head of them and she started to react. This little8 year old has had to carry an epi-pen with her since she was 18months old. People do not realize that exposure to peanuts could lead to anaphylactic shock and death. Since she was tiny she would say that she was allergic and I can't have that if her mother didn't supply the snack. Thank goodness she attends a small school that is peanut free. People like the above lady do not treat this seriously. It is not like someone breaking out in a rash from eating strawberries. Ava's family pray for her and worry about her everyday.

Anonymous said...

Why go political here??

Anonymous said...

Just a correction; aluminum doesn't cause alzhiemers- see: http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_myths_about_alzheimers.asp
In the meantime; let's go back to playing with sticks and rocks... outdoors.

Anonymous said...

Was a child of that time.
When summers were Long , Music you could understand and School clothes were cheap , and Life was Something !! And We Didn't have to worry about Others.. Miss the 70&80's....

Anonymous said...

The food allergies weren't a problem back in the day as much because, as some people mentioned, food was just starting to be overprocessed and full of things that I believe are causing all these bad reactions in children (and adults now). People are making it up that they get sick (and kids certaintly aren't making up food allergies when they go into anaphylactic shock!) But the environment we live in and the things we have been exposed to that we are passing on to our children is vastly different than in the 60's and 70's. Its too bad..

Anonymous said...

Kinda lame article. The "way things were" generalizations are played out and unimaginitive. I pretty much writeverything the same comment every time I see one of these posts.

fivefatcats said...

I really do make pancakes in alphabet shapes . . . but that other stuff is not me! So I'm ok, right?

Anonymous said...

OMG!! This is absolutely hilarious. I was born in 1960, and somehow we all survived white bread and no car seats. Today's parents are sadly, way too neurotic. Kids are overscheduled, spoiled and smothered. Get a grip! Signed - funky Grandma

Anonymous said...

This is so so funny, made me laugh out loud! A lot of people who have commented are missing the whole point of the article and how it's about ridiculous our society has become and their comments are proving this!

Anonymous said...

People seem to think "homeschooling " is equal to or better than going to school. That's BS. It may work in a few cases, but school, being with other kids in a social environment, learning to work as a group, and being exposed to different cultures and lifestyles...there is NO substitute

Anonymous said...

Loved my holly hobby lunch box...

Anonymous said...

Thank you all for your posts I have not only relived my childhood with great vivid memories that I cherish..I also got validated with my choices for my kids Lunches in between the years 1996-2004..Bento boxes food allergies etc catering to all that now wouldn't happen on my watch.....

Anonymous said...

Dukes of Hazard aired in 1979 and Cheese Balls originated by Chee-tos as Cheetos Puffies in 1971

Anonymous said...

I just had to reply. I was a 70's mom and a lot of this is true re. lunches. However now I am over 70, a product of whatever went into or around this body, and I have an auto-immune disease. Comparing notes, many of my fellow sufferers suspect it's our environment and toxins in our foods as well. I grew up with virtually no gmo or non-organic food. My mom grew a garden for part of the year and the only food that was not 'natural' at the time was a wiener, a hot dog. However that all changed as we know. I use McDonald's as the harbinger of all that is not right with our foods, the era of fast or convenience foods. I had never even heard of a peanut allergy until recent years. There has to be a happy medium, maybe starting with healthy lunches and meals at home, and having the kids walk to school, build in cardiovascular exercise. The 'fear factor' has brought about child coddling to the nth degree. Gee, I, a girl, walked home often in darkness as school went to 4 pm and we lived in the prairies, bitter cold for part of the winter. Somehow I stayed fit and slim until.... well let's see, the late seventies?

Anonymous said...

I am that mom who always forgets the first day picture. In fact, the last professional pics of the kids were at least 5 years ago. The last kid has hardly any :) Thanks for the throwback!

Anonymous said...

I was made to walk home for lunch (1950's, city) including winter unless the temperature was below -20F, then I had a 'treat' of staying for lunch and was given money for the city bus. . It was about a mile to my school. Ah the good old days. My kids went to school in the sixties and always had to walk. We lived either in a city or suburbs.

Anonymous said...

Move to Toronto. It is NOT exaggerated... The above is real life. LOL!

Anonymous said...

Makes me wonder...is all of this new stuff for the kids or the parents? Parents are under so much stress these days to be perfect and raise perfect children. Not to mention the stress on the kids when they aren't "like" everyone else. It's scary what this world is coming too :(

Anonymous said...

I was raised in the 70's and yes it's all true including coming home and playing outside until it got dark. Drinking out of any garden hose and playing dangerous games like guns, red river, dirt clod wars, etc. those were great free times. We ate everything and were always skinned because we ran everywhere outside until we were exhausted.

KItty said...

Hey, I just love this! In October my high school class of 1978 is having our "35 + 1" reunion. Can I make a copy of this to put on each table for a great discussion starter?

Anonymous said...

2014 mom is SO Dallas! I laugh at all those people who don't think this is real. It totally is!

Anonymous said...

I miss the 70s.

Anonymous said...

I grew up in the 70s and had an allergy to tree nuts. If I ate them, I would have a severe reaction, ranging from an asthma attack to anaphylaxis.

Other people having tree nuts was fine, but I could not eat them. You would be surprised how difficult it was to get that through peoples' heads, they acted like I'd said I didn't care for cabbage. I cannot imagine having a child who could die from peanut dust in the air.

Also, re: the suggestion that kids with those severe allergies should be home schooled. Total violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Would you say such a thing about a child who was in a wheelchair? Or who has cancer? Or who is blind?

Anonymous said...

My 6 yr old received a 6-page, double-sided, single-spaced 'rules and regulations for 1st grade' packet in the mail. Scary. Including calorie maximum and fiber minimum for pre-packaged classroom snacks. I'm guilty of many of those modern mom offenses, but DANG!!

Dogmom said...

This is a lighthearted look at back to school parents. For God's sake people, just read it and smile. What a bunch of uptight bores. Arguing about GMO's and DDT and allergies. I wish you types would just GO AWAY. What a miserable bunch of joy sucks. I loved reading this. I was a 70's kid, back to school was pretty much like this. I miss those days and the normalness or the people back then.

Anonymous said...

My mom smoked Marlboros. She would send me to the store when I was 8 with a note for the cashier saying it was ok for me to buy the cigs for her.

Emmaline Hoffmeister said...

Thank goodness I home school and this is NOT the case around here, though I laugh at how familiar it is to so many of my friends.

Becky Lee said...

As I was reading the 70s sandwich making I'm thinking "That's what I'm taking to lunch for work except for the cheese. Note to self put cheese on sandwich in morning." Guess my food choices haven't changed since I was in school in the 70s.

Anonymous said...

Consuming wonder bread, pop tarts, Virginia slims and sweet and low in the 70's and 80's.... Then shock and wonder why the children of the 90's and 00's have crazy allergies and astounding rates of diabetes and chronic illness. Thanks, for subsidizing corn in the 50's, US Govt. the pharmaceutical industry wouldn't survive without you.

mamasam said...

Awesome. I want a homeschool version of this. Get up, have coffee, let the kids sleep in. Get them cereal, do math in pajamas, make them read, eat lunch, make them wash their own stinkin' dishes. Get dressed...etc....

Anonymous said...

OMG!!!!! You people are ALL such ASSSSSSESSSS. Get a life!

Anonymous said...

Dukes of Hazzard premiered January 26, 1979. No, I didn't know the exact date. Yes, I knew the month and year off the top of my head. I loved me some stock car racing and Catherine Bach.
I also remember school ran from Jerry Lewis Telethon until fifth or sixth sitcom repeat. What's this August crap? I remember my mother caring a lot about clothes. I was geek enough to care about supplies ("Ooo, we need to get the new Mead Data Center, Mom!"). I had an Adam 12 lunch box that lasted for years because it rarely got used -- the school served lunch and, anyway, Mom wasn't dealing with fixing my lunch in the morning. She had enough on her hands getting herself together for work. I handled me from second grade forward. I was excited about heading to the bus stop, seeing school friends I hadn't seen in months.
Patterns repeat. I only stress about getting fitting uniform parts. Wife worries about the backpack each year. The lunch boxes for camp work for school. Heck, school just means packing healthy snacks (their cafeteria beats some mid-level restaurants) instead of packing lunches. Her first school had the lengthy supply list that included three colors of markers, noise-canceling headphones and a rain poncho (Like OP, I'm in South Florida where many schools lack indoor halls) that had me grumbling while picking through the remnants of School Prep Rush at Office Depot because that school started later than everyone else.
But nobody -- not Mom, not me as kid or parent, not my daughter -- has shed a single tear on the first day of school. We've all had the same reaction to our peers that did weep: "What the heck are you crying for? You're free for the next six and a half hours!"

Erin said...

I have had allergies all my life. Thankfully, my food allergies have not gotten to the point of needing an epi-pen. To give an idea, I am allergic to milk, eggs, soy, artificial sweeteners, and just for an added bonus, I am also highly allergic to bees and the like. Now much more under control, I used to have severe asthma made worse by my(at the time) unknown allergies. With the aide of steroids for my lungs and a better understanding of what my allergies due to me, I have been able to bring my asthma down to a moderate level as an adult. Soy and milk are the ones that affect my breathing and digestive tract. Eggs are strictly gastrointestinal issues. And artificial sweeteners have been found to be one of the causes for my past seizures. Obviously, this limits what I can safely consume on a daily basis. My asthma was one of the reasons my mom DID pull me out to home-school for two years.. I hated it because I am a social person and as a single-mother, it was hard for her to include "social activities" into our every.single.day. studies..
My allergies weren't severe enough to warrant epi-pen status; I shudder to think about how much worse it could have been. When my son starts school next year, I will be sure to note the allergies of other classmates. He is allergic to strawberries, an allergy that has proven to become worse with time in my family.

Anonymous said...

I had to walk home everyday for lunch. No bag lunch for me, except on field trips. 70's

Anonymous said...

I must be a grandmother. I don't take my grandkids to McDonalds, yet I let the kids play games with bats, balls, empty pop bottles and taught the ten year old to start a campfire. I take away his I Pad and he complains until I point to the door and tell him to find something to do. Then they come in and have to eat tator tot hotdish, roast beef dinner or chicken and dumplings. Heaven forbid there are recognizable vegetables in it! I cut them big enough so they can pick them out. Next year they will work for the veg so they will plant a garden and watch the veg grow.
I was a busy parent but couldn't afford fast food. Then they got to be teenagers and all the hungry kids ended up at my house for real food

Today I watched my 18 month old grand daughter play outside and be able to do it barefoot with a box of raisins in her hand. I survived the dirt and no fast food, but I sure did hate the Saturday dusting and other chores.

Let them play, eat a little dirt and be creative. Keep the darlings busy.

Anonymous said...

Absolutely hysterical!!! SPOT ON for my childhood ... born in 68 and I've been a teacher for 25 years and what I see now and what we ask for now is crazy ... and other than the amount spent at the mall, I thought the NOW part was also SPOT ON ... and very funny.

Anonymous said...

Many thanks to the previous Anon commenter with your info about celiac disease. I am very new to trying to eat gluten free, or at least reduce greatly the amount of gluten I consume. I thought it was kind of a trendy thing, didn't really think I would EVER have to consider it. But funny enough, I kept getting sick, had joint pain (even though I'm in my 30's), and horrible, horrible stomach/intestinal tract pain, not to mention the bathroom business that was awful. I began doing research, found a new doctor who actually listened and had me do a toxin survey, and my score was almost triple the minimum score that necessitated a cleanse.

Over the years, our food has changed. With wheat, scientists have cross-bred, experimented, and developed a wheat that is hearty to withstand drought or too much rain, and some varieties are "Round Up ready," meaning there is pesticide WITHIN the seed/wheat so that when bugs try to eat it, it kills them. THIS is why so many people are developing gluten sensitivity/intolerance/Celiac Disease.

So before you spout off about how we've been eating dairy and wheat "since the beginning of recorded history," I encourage you to first educate yourself. I encourage you to watch "Forks Over Knives" and "Food, Inc." for starters. Learn about how food--even "good" and "wholesome" food is really Frankenfood, manufactured for the bottom line, not optimal health. Check out what is happening with corn in regards to population control. It might sound like I'm a conspiracy theorist, but I'm finally opening my eyes to what is happening.

And if all else fails, good luck when your stomach feels like a knife is trying to cut its way out of your guts. Good luck when you have to RUN to the bathroom at work within 30 minutes or less of eating lunch. Seriously, giggle all you want, but I bet your giggling stops when you experience these things and more.

Anonymous said...

We have both in our house. I use both, but plastic baggies allow more flexibility in packing the lunch/snack box. We recycle religiously, walk all over South Beach instead of drive (including the mile to camp), save energy all over the house, etc. But you've got to let me have my plastic baggies and my 20 mpg Mustang that's the cool car at drop off or somebody's getting hurt.

Anonymous said...

As a current teacher and student in the 80's...I find both sides very exaggerated. However, the 2014 part is so innacurate, I almost starting laughing.. maybe true if you go to a private school in the Hamptons.

Anonymous said...

Most of you have just proved this blogs point ... and that would be hilarious too if you hadn't drained the funny out of the whole thing ... whole like "entire" ... not whole like whole wheat or whole grain or Whole foods ... or even HOLY COW BATMAN! ... I miss the days of Turpentine, Lysol, and Vinegar and a stereo that was the size of a coffee table because when my parents put it on, everyone listened to the same record and no one had earbuds.

Anonymous said...

Oh please I am not paying tons of money for my kid to loose all my tupperware (the few I can even find lids for) . I loved this and I had it worse we made are own lunches and cafeteria food was a treat lol. Get off your high horses and gain your sense of humor. I totally agree that if your child has allergies (as mine does) YOU not everyone else in the class is responsible to keep your child safe even if that means home schooling. I would never ask a whole class of children to go without because my daughter has to. She is homeschooled for that reason. Give me a break people are making things so complicated you almost have to go underground for a twinkie.

Anonymous said...

Man, people who parented in the 70s sure knew everything! It's awesome that they knew you could totally chain smoke and feed your 5 year old shitty processed cheese product with no health consequences. That's why the over 50 crowd is healthy and fit with no devastating cancer rates or alzheimzers diagnoses or type 2 diabetes or...

Wait a minute...

Could it be that what you did when you were young and the habits that you continue now that you're old have ruined your health?

Huh, I guess ignorance is not bliss. Or maybe you haven't had the misfortune of watching a loved one waste away due to diseases that are really quite preventable when you know better.

Some people take the whole organic hippy dippy thing too far, but I'd rather have a generation of kids growing up eating real food than the shitty processed convenience food ushered in with the 70s. Sorry not sorry.

Anonymous said...

This was an almost completely accurate description of my past summer, right down to the glitter cloud and summer camp! Thank you! And I'm already stressed about if they don't make it through the academically gifted program!

Jamie said...

Bwahaha loved it! Thanks for the laughs!!!!

Anonymous said...

The 1550's were the best!

Anonymous said...

The spoon made me fat

Anonymous said...

As a child of the 60's, they actually gave us the paper, pencils, crayons, glue, construction paper, etc....which we needed. And in high school I did not have to pay to participate in marching band. About the only thing I was ever required to buy for school was a calculator for 12th grade trigonometry. It cost $70 and had 8 functions. Four years later they had shrunk to the size of a credit card, and they were giving them away as promotional items, along with keychains and ball point pens.

Anonymous said...

Still did that in the 80 's and 90's

Anonymous said...

Yes and why does the first day & last day of EVERY grade your child is in or completes for the year starting in elementary school have to be such a huge production? Between all the excessive pictures and extra relatives that have to be there getting in the way, you'd think the kids were graduating high school. I was a child of the 80's and do not remember taking any pictures for school until *gasp* picture day! Can you imagine. Somehow I still ended up well adjusted believe it or not. I definitely do not remember the last day of school ever being a circus either. But hey, it's the last day & we all know everyone's child is too damn good to ride the bus on that one day. Even though I did every single year. I just shake my head & roll my eyes on those 2 days as I drop off & pick my kids up every day of school, being a stay at home mom. By the way, any tears you would ever see in my eyes are from allergies, nothing more...

Jodi J. said...

Numbers 5 though 10 of the 70s list KILLED me! lol!

Anonymous said...

I like how many precautions are being taken today about allergies..... but do not tell me what my child can or cannot have in his lunch. The same risk was there 10, 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 years ago and people made it through just fine. Not like your kids know how to share something these days anyways so what are you afraid of?

Anonymous said...

Most of them do not even have an actual allergy, but rather the parent not wanting their kids to eat certain types of food.

Anonymous said...

Steve said it about right. All of this worry about organic, gluten free, etc, etc., is all secondary. People are dying from obesity related diseases and lack of exercise, pure and simple.

Anonymous said...

71 y/o great-g'ma here .. my kids and grandkids all survived .. I was pleased about that .. I also thought this article was funny but 2014 hit too close to the truth! One Question: WHY are so many of today's children allergic to so many things ?? Could it possibly be our modern environment ?? This is the answer we need to find .. and quickly .. before we manage to wipe the planet clear of Humans. But still .. I, too, laughed when reading this and the comments .. :) I remember my Mother smiling through her tears as we 4 trooped off to our first day of school (one block away) every September .. A mixed blessing .. :D

Anonymous said...

Thank God I was a mom in the 70's and 80's.

Anonymous said...

This was the best!!!!!!

Anonymous said...

Thankfully I went to school in the 50's 60's. No lunch boxes, just brown paper bags and carton of milk from the school cafeteria.

Anonymous said...

Really people actually do all that Crap ! Ridiculous. Why be thankful you went to school in the 70's or 80's when you can just say No to most of this ridiculousness !!

Anonymous said...

seriously ? birds don't matter much ? You should read a little more about the small effects a tiny BEE has, There's also a video out of the effect putting wolves back into population in Yosemite National Park. Every tiny animal matters. It's your thought process that will eventually kill our Earth.

70s girl said...

It was Chesterfield no filter in my house. And you had to make your own lunch because Mom was busy sleeping in!

Bobby Boy said...

70s? My daughters were in Middle School and High School in the 70s. During part of this period, they got up at 0-dark-30 to deliver the local newspaper on their bicycles. When they were in grade school, we lived only a block away, and they walked along an abandoned railway right-of-way to the schoolyard. I was in school during the 40s and 50s and remember desks with inkwells.

Anonymous said...

This is hilarious! Thanks for the good laugh and for those of you who didn't find the humor on this...lighting up, you might have a heart attack if you are always uptight :) life is too short not to laugh.

Anonymous said...

Lol, yeah, Anon, smoke in the car/house and let your kids watch the Real Housewives of Orange County while clutching their hypersexualized Bratz lunch boxes with images of young girls dressed like sex workers. Super high quality, non-helicopter parenting right there. Or, you know, you could try giving a damn.

Anonymous said...

Forgot the part about walk into the school, carry in and hang up your child's backpack then hover outide the classroom door nervously to make sure the teacher is doing his/her job right…

Anonymous said...

I loved this article - thought it extremely funny & enlightening. My husband, Mark, grew up in rural Montana & also found a lot of the article enlightening as this was not his experience from being a 70's/80's school going kid. I was one of these kids who went to school in the 70's & 80's - but in Africa and I can say our experience (from what was described here) was significantly different. We had uniforms firstly, we never got sandwiches like they described (sounds just gross too), shopping trips for school supplies started after kids were back to school & had to be planned (and the schools knew this as most of the kids lived a far distance from stores or shops). We are now parents of kids who go to school these days, and their story is also significantly different from what was described here. They start school in July (year-round-school), wear uniforms (so costs are not as exorbitant as described here), get their supply lists (which fortunately is only 1 page long for each child including optional extras for art class, Spanish and music classes) before school starts. They have parents who want the best for their kids without having to go broke in the process - so do wise-buying & stock-pile of food items that are non-perishable. We spent an extra $8 on each kid's backpack 3 years ago (than the going rate was then) & got them day-hiking backpacks which came with a 20 yr guarantee - they still look good and are going strong - they did not get new backpacks last year or this year! We grow some of the foods we send with them and they get fruit & veggies that are in season and on sale for the items we buy. The school that they are going to lets parents (of kids with allergies) know when there is going to be a birthday celebrated in the classroom - and we get to send an appropriate treat with the kid that day. They do not expect other kids (without allergies) to do without because 1 or 2 kids have issues. I am the parent of a kid with dairy allergies and she has learnt how to live responsibly with her allergy & knows the consequences of digressing. The rest of her class is aware of her allergy but we are not going to cut out a fairly easy & cheap form of protein & calcium out of their lives and diets because my kid has the allergy (it is a true allergy not a sensitivity) Yes, life has changed dramatically since the 70's & 80's - some for the good and some for the bad & you, your kids get the choice of how easy, how pleasant, how cheap and creative and fun you want the experience to be. I HATE shopping esp in the madness of crowds & the craziness that has become the norm here in the US during special sales and events - so I do plan ahead (way-ahead) so it can be as fun and stress-free as possible- sometimes because of that planning getting items for their upcoming school year free or next-to-free using sales in May with coupons.

Lance said...

this is why we are homeschooling .. / sending them to private christian school... my kids will never see the inside of a public gov run school. I was born in 69 and its insane what kids have to do ( or cant do ) now. Im so glad i was raised in the 70s and i refuse to subject my kids to the PC progressive insanity of today.

Lance Stinson



"On every question of construction carry ourselves back to the time when the Constitution was adopted, recollect the spirit manifested in the debates and instead of trying what meaning may be squeezed out of the text or invented against it, conform to the probable one in which it was passed." --Thomas Jefferson

I do not want to be a Global Citizen,
I want to be a FREE AMERICAN.

"I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy." -- John Adams

"For God so loved the world that He sent His only begotten Son; that whosoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life." -- John 3:16

support the USA and protect the Constitution! "Every Race, Every Tribe.

Anonymous said...

Same here, mom worked full time, dad worked overnights. No packed lunches, guess I was unusual that I liked most everything they served at school. Oh and about driving the kids to school, from what I've seen of current, even if you let your child ride the bus (gasp), then you drive them the three blocks to the bus stop and wait in the idling suv until the bus is there.

Anonymous said...

Yay homeschooling. The socially backward weirdo kids who dont understand the thrill of climbing the rope to the top in gym class and ringing the bell! Then signing your name to the wall.... to be found by your kids years later

Anonymous said...

Forget when I went to school, thank the Lord my kids went to school in the 80's and 90's.

Anonymous said...

I rocked my poncho :)

Anonymous said...

Just read Silent Spring by Rachel Carson- I put it off so many years, and was amazed to actually read her words. True, we eliminated the malarial mosquito in the US by spraying DDT- but in attempts to use it to eliminate other dangerous or nuisance insects we created resistant insects. Including resistant malarial mosquitos in other parts of the world. It is not and never was a magic bullet. Carson's point in the book is that DDT while LESS dangerous than the insecticides that were prevalent before it was still dangerous (to many people with immediate allergic-type sensitivities who died from the stuff as well as through bioaccumulation to all animal life). Anyway just try to honestly educate yourself, not fall for hype, b/c most folks are trying to do a good job and do what's right but there are many in power (and not) who do follow the same old story of just trying to make a buck.

Anonymous said...

All requesting the exact same information over and over again!!!

Anonymous said...

Thank you for making my morning! I'm crying I'm laughing so hard! This is by far the funniest thing I've read in a long time! ❤️ A mom born in 1971

Tevo said...

THIS!

Anonymous said...

Because its so STUPID! Parents arent parents, their Worshipers of Children!

Anonymous said...

This was so funny! My mom would make egg salad in the morning and while the sandwiches were awesome, they would stink up the lunch box as well. My cool older brother in high school was left out, he had to take his lunch in a brown paper bag!

Anonymous said...

We are sitting by the lake in Western Maine wondering how our grandkids are going to survive using 1970 back-to-school protocols.

Michael Irwin said...

(From recollections from the receiving end)
1960 version.
End of previous summer term: order next year's school uniform jacket. It gets delivered in August.
Go to Woolworths a week before school starts for pencil cases, pencils, erasers, and school bag if needed (not a backpack).
Buy shoes, socks, and trousers (all black!) From local store (no flared trousers!!).
Get up at 6 and start breakfast (bacon & eggs).
Drag kids out of bed at 7 and force into bathroom!
Feed kids at 7.30
Throw kids out of front door at 7.50 with a shilling for fares to get public bus to school.
Relax until 5 pm
Start dinner prep -kids leave school at 5.30 and will be home for dinner at 6.30

Anonymous said...

pretty accurate for Fish Hawk just outside of Tampa Florida. :)

Anonymous said...

I'm just glad I went to school int the 60's 70's .... and have no kids. All the BS that you have to buy now is stupid. Not to mention the huge "supplies" fees you have to pay for certain classes. If I had kids they would be home schooled where they are not indoctrinated by socialism, learn personal responsibility, and how to do things for oneself.

Anonymous said...

I had a Muppets lunchbox. If I still had it, I would send it to you.

andrea said...

Yes, it is true of many parents, that they have turned in to "helicopter" parents, always hovering over their children, obsessing about every last detail, putting their kids in to all these extra after school classes, groups... I don't follow this trend though. I let my kids have "nothing to do" after they get out of school, they play in the yard, or whatever they want to do, being a kid with no cares and no responsibilities is important! Getting dirty, eating junk food and/or the school's lunch, and riding bikes!

preesi said...

Wide Lawns? The only school districts that make kids buy school supplies, like toilet paper, and erasers and flour, are in the RED STATES.
The BLUE STATES supply EVERYTHING. All of my sons schools even supplied pencils, folders and crayons and a calculator.

muzzy said...

I can remember walking 2 miles to school and home again (up hill both ways) every day with a oil dripping pepper and egg sandwich wrapped in wax paper in a bag cut down from the grocery store. Please bring back my youth1

Anonymous said...

So great! I went to school in the 70s and now a mom of 3 school aged kids! I think about how different it is back then to now everyday! Life is simple..we make it complicated! Great trip down memory lane! I

Anonymous said...

What a bunch of self-righteous pussies we as a society have become in the past 30-40 years.

Anonymous said...

LOL!!! Thank you for writing this! Things were so much simpler in the 70's and "most" of us turned out just fine. :-)

Barb said...

I think the 70's example could go ever further back; very reminiscent of my childhood. Except you forgot a few things. Forget the schoolbus, we rode our bikes to school. WITHOUT A HELMET. If it rained we (mom and 5 kids) piled into a car WITHOUT SEATBELTS. Now I'm not advocating that these are not good things but somehow whole generations survived without them. Probably helped that my mom was only managing her Pall Mall and not talking, texting or checking a GPS screen.

I do wish some things had been invented when my kids were growing up in the 80's, especially the adorable little cloth thing I saw the other day that completely covered every aspect of a shopping cart seat so precious baby would not touch the handle or side rungs of said cart. Whole products built on fear of germs? Must be Howie Mandels company!

Hilarious; even the holier than thou preaching from some. Bet their home life is devoid of GMO's and humor.

Anonymous said...

I STILL don't refrigerate my bologna sandwich at work! I'm sure I will probably die soon, but at least I had a good sandwich first!

Anonymous said...

I went to school in the 30's and 40's; Imagine my thoughts on this.

Anonymous said...

I am also glad I went to school in the 70's but remember it is us that turned these creatures into the spoiled generation. We have no one to blame but ourselves.

Anonymous said...

This is hysterical, but another big change from the 70's is that what's going on now to get a kid(s) off to school is around both parents working full time. Not an easy task at all.

donaldchar said...

The sad thing is that this is all true. I started homeschooling in the early 80's. Things were relatively still normal then. Being a one income family wasn't easy, but I got to be there for all my kid's firsts, first step, word, etc.
Remember when, we never had to by extra things for school? All sanitation products and schoolroom necessities were provided. Musical instruments were loaned for the school year for free, sports didn't cost to be involved in and equipment was provided for free. Yet we still managed to get educations that sent men to the moon, plumbed the depths of the sea, created medical breakthroughs. We didn't use calculators to do math in school, or need to use a computer to find information,( ever hear of periodicals, and using the a card catalog at the library?). The education we got back then helped to create computers. Yet now we have a higher illiteracy rate, and find that people with college degrees are working a couple of fast food jobs just to survive.
When a poor struggling family has to shell out two hundred dollars a year per child, just to supply one child's responsibility to her kindergarten class, I mean what classroom needs 80 large refill bottles of hand soap(that's 2 per child a semester for a 20 kid classroom), one can only feel like they're selling some of this stuff or donating it for tax write offs. What happened to the simple but very educated classrooms of the past?

Anonymous said...

I don't remember kids with allergies either. The thing is, we aren't eating the same foods now as then. Wheat, corn, dairy, soy, are just a few of the items that are genetically different today than they were then. We are essentially eating factory produced versions of those foods, unless you are purchasing a certified organic and non-GMO version. The food I ate as a kid (I'm 46) was a cleaner version of today's food. The amount of people today with allergies and other immunosuppressed diseases is staggering. Something has to be causing it and I choose to blame it on human intervention in food production. That being said, I thought the article, while clearly a bit of an exaggeration on both generations, was quite funny and did hit some things spot on. Peanut butter and fluff sandwiches? Heck yes - still love them to this day!

Anonymous said...

Does the person who wrote this article even have kids? Or are they speaking from their 70s experience as a parent? Because the 2014 rendition of this is so far out of touch they might as well be representing today's GOP.

I still laughed though...cause anyone who actually goes through even a third of the stress portrayed here is pretty ridiculous our mentally insane.

Anonymous said...

10. The night before the first day of school prepare the bento boxes. Fill containers with organic, local strawberries intricately cut into the shapes of sea creatures. Include homemade, nut free granola made with certified gluten-free oats. Make a sandwich on vegan hemp bread out of tahini, kale and jicama. Form it into the shape of your child's favorite Disney character. Make flowers out of non-dairy cheese slices, olives and seaweed. Photograph the finished Bento Box and post it to Instagram.

This made me LOL! I actually laughed my head off thru this! How funny and SO true! It's just ridiculous what we do today for our kids. So over the top & most of it probably unnecessary! I remember my daughter had a boy in her class whose mom included a place mat & cloth napkin to go along with his silverware!

Anonymous said...

I was the mom in the 80's and smoked Marlboro!

Anonymous said...

OMG yes! I also remember the brown paper sack and how it smelled when you pulled your sandwich (with mayo!) out of the bag. How I didn't die from eating warm mayo is beyond me!

Anonymous said...

I graduated HS in 1959. Bought school lunches for 20 cents. Lunches were made from scratch. I worked lunch time in the cafeteria and set out china and silverware for the first three grades. That's grades 1-3, no kindergarten. Children then learned manners that way. As a senior in HS, ate what was put before me whether I liked it or not (mostly liked it) because there was nothing to eat between lunch and evening meal. Yeah, I'm glad I was raised in the 50's. Would never want to kowtow to little ones today.

Kathi said...

I love you. Period. Laughed and then cried.....

Anonymous said...

People, really.. lighten up. Most parents would NOT send an allergen intentionally just because it was more convenient for them. Most people do not want to do harm, especially to children. This post was just a reminder of how much more aware we are today of our surroundings than in the 70's, in an amusing and funny way.

Breton Wench said...

140 comments !!!!!
You rock Victoria !

Formidable (to be said with a French accent.)

Anonymous said...

You can't blame the current generation on these changes as the 70's generation are the ones that brought about these changes to the current generation.

The 70's generation are the ones promoting all these changes including "safer" playgrounds, not letting kids play outside when it's hot, buying children iPads and cell phones, and are the ones in parental roles now restricting what kids can do but let them play video games all day long.

Last time I checked, a kindergartener didn't buy the iPad they are playing with. Parents need to step up and be more responsible and encourage an active lifestyle.

Anonymous said...

I grew up in the 50;s and 60's. Walt Disney and Lassie were on Sunday nights. Romper room and Captain Kangaroo was on before school in the mornings. Cartoons were on Saturday morning: Tom and Jerry, Popeye, the Jetson's, the Flintstones, Sherry Lewis and Lambchop..... There was Roy Rogers and Dale Evens show, the three stooges, Bonanza, The Mickey Mouse Club, black and white TV, and I survived. We road our bikes everywhere without helmets. We had to walk to school. On the first day of school we all received a box of crayons, a pink eraser, a set of watercolors, #2 pencils. We did not have to supply the classroom with boxes of tissue. No calculators - we had slide rules. Needed PF Flyers for gym class. Had tap and ballet after school that was actually taught at school in the lunch room. During the summer we played Monopoly for at least a week before someone had all the properties with hotels on them. We had hoola hoops and rollerskates that needed a key to get them tight to our shoes. Saddle shoes for girls and pants were not allowed. Girls had to be in a skirt or dress. I think the kids of today are missing out on so much. School never started before Labor Day. There were no teacher in-service days. With our final report card (actually made from heavy paper) we found out what teacher we would have next year.

Anonymous said...

. . . You sound like a 2014 mom.

LaurenAct513 said...

http://www.scarymommy.com/back-to-school-the-70s-vs-today/

Is this yours too? It is odd that the same blog with different pictures appeared in two places. I hope this person didn't steal it from you.

That said, I'm glad I'm not quite the parent that you depicted for today, though the school supply list was completely on target. The teachers have to personally buy a ton for their classrooms too.

As a kid of the 70s I know that that part is spot on. I love that it mentions the frosted apple pop tarts. They were my favorite. I wish they'd bring them back.

denis said...

i went to school in the late 90s and early 2000s i relate a lot more to the 70s one then the 2014 thingie, i had to google what half the food was from the 2014 one, a lot has changed in 10 years

Anonymous said...

life was much easier.................... with 4 television channels.

Anonymous said...

We can always pick out home-schooled kids. They have better manners, are excited about learning and seem to play fair and more willing to share than other kids. They don't stand around looking bored and just wanting to be on some electronic equipment. A joy to be around. They still have after school activities but not so many they have no time to be children. That is just our observation.

Gordana.M said...

You are BRILLIANT! :D Now, I need to read more of your writing :)

Anonymous said...

Yep, hot lunch every day from the cafeteria. No way my mom was going to make 10 kids sack lunches. Field trip days I had to make my own. They were interesting since wenever had lunch meat , white bread, snacks in the house. Usually a cucumber or tomato sandwich with Miracle Whip, orange juice poured into a canning jar and a half of a protein bar. All in a grocery sack or bread sack because we had no lunch sacks. Lol

Anonymous said...

Why do we have all these kids with so many allergies? This was not a major concern years ago to my knowledge-at least not in school. What has caused all these allergies? What do these same children do when they grow p? How do they protect themselves from others around them who may be eating something, touching something the next person with allergies touch, etc?

Anonymous said...

Couldn't for the life of me figure out what a "bento box" is? In the 50's we didn't even get what kids got in the 70's. Sandwich and an apple (or banana) was about all there was. Once in a while a bag of potato chips. Mom made my shirts.

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